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Increased oxidized LDL and decreased insulin sensitivity by dietary fructose

In a study by Stanhope  et al . dietary fructose was shown to induce an increase in circulating levels of oxidized LDL and a decrease in insulin sensitivity compared to dietary glucose in older overweight or obese adults.

In a study by Stanhope et al. (J Clin Invest 119:1322-1334, 2009) dietary fructose was shown to induce an increase in circulating levels of oxidized LDL and a decrease in insulin sensitivity compared to dietary glucose in older overweight or obese adults. The authors speculate that the increase in oxidized LDL levels in subjects consuming fructose is associated with increased levels of small dense LDL particles, due to altered lipid metabolism and lipid remodeling. Small dense LDL particles are known to be more readily oxidized than larger LDL particles. 

 

Stanhope et al. propose that the observed hepatic lipid increase resulting from fructose-induced de novo lipogenesis leads to hepatic insulin resistance, possibly by increasing levels of diacylglycerol, a known activator of protein kinase C (PKC). Increases of both diacylglycerol and novel PKC activity has been shown to be associated with lipid-induced insulin resistance.

 

Read the abstract 

 

 

Product used in this publication

 

Oxidized LDL Competitive ELISA 10-1158-01


 


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